Slow Drains: How To Get Rid Of Your Drain Annoyance

Slow Drains: How To Get Rid Of Your Drain Annoyance

All water fixtures in your house are designed for smooth and relatively quick draining. Used water has to be removed quickly, or a host of issues will arise. A ring around your sink is the least of them. All plumbing fixtures are connected to a main drain line, through which water will eventually flow out of your house to wastewater treatment system. At some point in life, however, your plumbing’s drain system in your house will have issues, such as slow drains. Slow drains means that water does not flow through the wastewater pipes as quickly as it should. This will lead to more serious problems, unless properly repaired. What is a sign of a slow drain? When water does not flow down your sewer line quickly enough, you may notice some unusual gurgling sounds from inside the drain pipe. Gurgling sounds can come out from the toilet, bathtub, shower, kitchen sink, and basically any water fixture. The easiest explanation is that when waste water flows against any obstruction inside the pipe, it bumps around, and traps air that creates the disturbing gurgling noises. If not treated immediately, gurgling sounds will get worse and turn into water backup issues. Another example of a slow Plumbing systems are designed to drain water from a fixture, just as quickly as water enters the fixture. So if you have to turn your faucet or shower off during use, just to let the water drain out, you have a slow drain. This is an annoyance you should take the time to remedy Causes of slow drains Slow drains are indeed not the worse...
A Hydro Jetter Saves You When Other Sewer Drain Tools Fail

A Hydro Jetter Saves You When Other Sewer Drain Tools Fail

A hydro jetter may just be the best piece of sewer cleaning equipment ever invented. Let us help you to understand it by first by explaining how it works. The basic principle of a hydro jetter is similar to that of pressure washer used to clean heavy equipment, or for industrial purposes. Both pieces of equipment use highly pressurized water to get rid of any physical object in its way. As a pressure washer is used as a cleaning machine for walls, floors, and open areas. A hydro jetter is used for enclosed spaces, such as inside a sewer pipe. The standard configuration of a hydro jetter unit includes a pump, motor, hose, and an assortment of nozzles. It also needs adequate supply of water, in the form of a holding tank. The motor has a control panel to fine-tune the amount of water pressure sent through the hose and nozzle. As pressurized water comes out of the specially designed nozzle, it flows right through all sorts of clogs. It routinely clears out leaves, grease, rust, soap, dirt, and tree roots. Pressure and Flow Rate of a Hydro Jetter Pressurized water is much more reliable and environmentally friendly for unclogging blockages in sewer pipes compared to chemicals. Professional operators can dial the right settings for flow rate, water pressure, and choose the correct nozzle. This allows the operator to get the most effective cleaning action along the inside of the sewer pipe. The correct nozzle plays an important role in determining the direction of water flow from the hose. Some nozzles can spray water all around the inside the...
A Sewer Snake Is Your Drain Cleaning Best Friend

A Sewer Snake Is Your Drain Cleaning Best Friend

If you’ve been living in a house long enough, you will find yourself dealing with some sort of plumbing drain problem sooner or later. If that is true for you, then you know a sewer snake is not a menace, but your friend! Among all the possible plumbing issues, a clogged sink or drain is one of the most common. You’ve probably done some preventive measures, but it is bound to happen at some point in time anyway. Fortunately a minor clogged sink is easy to repair, and you don’t even need to purchase an expensive specialty tool to get the job done. The ubiquitous sewer snake should cover your needs in most cases. The Six Typical Types Of A Sewer Snake In its basic form, a sewer snake (also referred to as plumber’s snake, snake auger, or drain auger) is a hand-operated drain-cleaning tool. It consists of a long flexible metal cable, and a crank, that allows it to reach a clog inside a drain pipe. It can either push the clog through the pipe or pull it out. A sewer snake comes in at least 6 different styles and types, as follows: 1. Cable Augers This is the most basic form of a sewer snake. It is comprised of a flexible rod, a corkscrew attached to the end of it, and a handle or crank. It must be operated manually by turning the crank to push the rod out into the clogged pipe. As you turn the handle, the rod rotates and tries to grab the clog. You can continue pushing to let the rod pierce through...
What Is A Shower Trap And How It Prevents Drain Clogs

What Is A Shower Trap And How It Prevents Drain Clogs

A shower trap is a necessary plumbing fitting to prevent drain clogs inside a shower stall. In plumbing terminology, the term “shower trap” refers to a bent pipe installed between the initial horizontal drain line and the secondary horizontal line. Every water fixture in your house is directly connected to a secondary drain pipe. However, before wastewater enters the main drain line, it must travel through the trap. In certain water fixture, such as a kitchen sink, the trap sits just after a garbage disposal. This trap bends downward to resemble the letter “U” or “P” when inspected from a right angle, hence the term P-trap. A trap has 3 components Proper plumbing installation calls for every water fixture, including a shower, to be trapped. Just like any P-trap installed in other fixtures a shower trap prevents sewage gas, or any foul smell, in the main drain from entering the shower room. Sewer gas tends to rise, so eventually it can reach other areas inside the house. In its basic form a shower trap is comprised of three parts: Inlet (vertical) pipe through which wastewater from the shower drain enters the trap. The downward-bent pipe; it always contains water that acts as an airtight seal. Stagnant water in the pipe is displaced with wastewater coming out from the inlet pipe. Outlet (horizontal) pipe that directs wastewater towards a house stack, then the main house drain. Eventually, to a public sewer treatment plant or septic system. Without a shower trap, gases along with contaminants from sewer facilities will enter the inlet pipe and the house, causing odors and serious health...
How To Prevent And Unclog Toilet Blockages And Clogs

How To Prevent And Unclog Toilet Blockages And Clogs

How to unclog toilet blockages is not on the top of anyone’s “to do” list, or “know how to do” list either. But when needed, it can be a simple task taking only minutes, or a complicated ordeal requiring a professional. As house cleanliness is an inseparable part of a healthy lifestyle, preventing and clearing a toilet clog is a big part of that. You can sweep a dirty floor, wipe clean a kitchen counter-top, and throw away spoiled foods, but you cannot always tell when your toilet is about to get clogged. Let’s all admit a toilet clog is one of those things we go into denial about, especially when we hear those weird gurgling sounds. Let’s also admit that there are very few things more unpleasant and unsanitary that a water-backup from our toilet bowl. Some causes of a clogged toilet A clogged toilet ruins our floors, bathroom rugs, and puts a damper on the mood all around the house. If you are like most people, a clogged toilet is an almost inevitable occurrence in your house. There are times when somebody throws away something that doesn’t belong in your toilet, and flushes it down the bowl. For example toys, plastics, cigarette butts, cardboard toilet paper rolls, and what have you. Sometimes immediately, other times over time, those items will get stuck in your toilet, drain pipe, or somewhere in the S-bend or U-bend toilet trap. Even small objects, like Q-tips, which should go down as you flush, can stick to the pipe and build up a stubborn obstruction. Do not try to flush over and over...
Clogged Bath Tub Drain Prevention And Cures

Clogged Bath Tub Drain Prevention And Cures

Many a  clogged bath tub drain is preventable. But before we get to clog prevention, let’s understand the plumbing itself. Every bath tub is connected to its own drain pipe. Similar to other plumbing fixtures, a bath tub is not invulnerable to clogging. Between the drain pipe and the actual tub, there is usually (but not always) a p-trap to prevent sewage gas from entering the house. A P-trap contains a small amount of water to create an impenetrable seal through which there can be no exchange between the gas inside the pipe and air inside the building. The P-trap also helps to catch any unsuitable or large objects before they enter the drain system. When you pull on, or flip up, the tub drain stopper, water should flow down the drain pipe quickly without problems. In some cases, the water cannot drain fast enough. This is due to either due to a faulty tub drain cover, or a partial or full clog in the pipe. If the problem persists after you replace tub drain cover, chances are something in the pipe is obstructing the flow of water. The base of a bath tub (where the bath tub drain is located) is usually at a lower position than a toilet or sink, so when a main drain line is clogged (completely or partially) large volumes of wastewater from a sink and a toilet can flow back up into bath tub. The actual clog itself may exist in a much deeper location in the plumbing system, and can lead to serious damage. The point is that when water backs up...
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