Dry Wells Have Various Helpful Uses

Dry Wells Have Various Helpful Uses

Dry wells (also known as soakaway pits, soakwell, or soak pit), is one of the earliest models of a water runoff management system. The shape and design is similar to those of a water well, but dry wells are filled with gravel, or surrounded by gravel, and usually covered from sight. Unlike water wells that basically function as a water reservoir or holding tank, dry wells contain rainwater or wastewater, and allows this water  to percolate into the soil. Dry wells are primarily used as a means to control the excess of runoff water from the roof, finished surfaces, and basements as well. A properly designed dry well is connected to a series of pipes which collect and disperse water away from a particular area. A dry well tank, or basin, is located underground, but above the area’s water table. Dry wells installed in an areas water table (groundwater) will not function properly. In cases where there is a high water table, a leaching field may have to be used in place of dry wells. A dry well needs to be above water table so that the basin will contain air, and be empty of fluids. This design allows the dry well to absorb incoming water quickly until all the air is displaced. After it is full, a dry well can only absorb water as fast as it can dissipate the water inside of it to the surrounding gravel and sub soil. Two important points of constructing good dry wells To prevent frequent overflow a dry well has to be carefully designed by a professional Architect or Engineer. Soil...
Blocked Drains Can Be Prevented And Cured

Blocked Drains Can Be Prevented And Cured

Blocked drains are a relatively common occurrence. New York City is one of the most densely populated cities in the world, with complex private and public underground drain systems, and water supply systems as well. The city consists of the five boroughs of Brooklyn, Queens, Manhattan, The Bronx and Staten Island. With more than 28,000 people per square mile as of 2015, there is always the possibility of an improper plumbing installation that does not comply with city’s plumbing code, or misuse of the system. Some easy-to-repair blocked drains may turn into nasty, unhealthy, and unhygienic, disasters that affect a good number of residents in your community. Blocked drains are often preventable, and some of the common culprits are as follows. Grease Blocked Drains The most common cause of blocked drains are food residue and grease. Food residue, especially fatty ones, can easily stick and accumulate to the inside of the drain pipes. Over time, the buildup is hardened and it causes stubborn blockages. What starts as a soft build up of grease, eventually hardens into a tough to remove obstruction. One of the first symptoms of fat accumulation is slow drainage; if not treated properly, the accumulation gets bigger and completely prevents liquid materials from passing through the sink. It happens mostly in kitchen sinks. But if a drain pipe lacks pitch, grease can accumulate at that point as well. Hair Blocking A Drain In a bathroom or bathtub, blocked drains are often caused by a buildup of hair. Drain strainers do a great job of preventing hair from entering the pipe, but sometimes the hair gets stuck...
Common Yard Drainage Problems And Solutions For Property Owners

Common Yard Drainage Problems And Solutions For Property Owners

Yard drainage is probably the most overlooked component of your plumbing system. In a landscaped yard, paved area, or swimming pool area, poor drainage can present a whole range of issues if you are a property owner. Poor yard drainage makes for the risk of creating a breeding ground for insects, and foul stagnant water, both of which present health issues for you and your family.  Additional points of concern include ruined plants, shrubbery, and potential trip and falls. In many instances homeowners, such as yourself, tend to ignore such conditions until water drainage problems have become severe. Severe drainage issues can result in you and your family slogging around in bacteria and insect infested tainted water. Your front and back yards should not become similar to a jungle habitat. Some of the most common yard drainage problems 1. Clogged Yard Drains and Area Drains Many things can clog yard drains. Because many yard drains are located near a grass area,  the usual suspects are leaves, twigs, grass cuttings, and trash. You can see a small portion of yard drain from the grate and see if an accumulation of debris or sediment is obstructing the water flow. This cure can be as simple as opening the grate when necessary and removing these items lying in the base of the drain. You can use a garden scoop, or simply put on a rubber glove and use your hand. It is not advisable to flush them with a garden hose, as these items tend to clog the pipe itself. If there is a long-standing problem that has made its way into...
Sewer Cleanout Cap Locations, Types, And Proper Removal

Sewer Cleanout Cap Locations, Types, And Proper Removal

Understanding the purpose of a sewer cleanout cap is helpful. But understanding how to locate the proper  sewer cleanout, and remove the cap, is very important as well. There are basically two major components of house drain system. The main house drain, and the house sewer itself. The former is also commonly referred to as “sewer line” and it connects to the latter through a horizontal drain line typically located under the basement floor of a house. A house sewer is the outdoor portion of plumbing system, and it connects to either a municipal sewer or septic system. Between the main drain and house sewer or septic system, there should be a “cleanout” located close to the outside perimeter of the basement of the house. The main purpose is to provide easy access in case of clogging, both inside and outside the house. In most areas, including NYC, it would be a double vent house trap. Common Location of a Sewer Cleanout Cap The exact location of a sewer cleanout cap can be different from house to house, and in fact there are usually multiple cleanouts located inside the house. Not all plumbing systems are installed according to building codes, and codes vary from municipality to municipality. Under less-than-ideal circumstances, the cap is probably not visible due to accumulation of dirt on top of it, so you may need to do a little digging to see it. In other cases it may have had obstructions built over it. Sometimes interior walls, closets, or other items are placed over a cleanout preventing access. A sewer cleanout cap is usually installed...
What to Do If You Smell Sewer Gas From Your Queens Sewer

What to Do If You Smell Sewer Gas From Your Queens Sewer

Sewer gas smells are distinctive, not to mention highly unpleasant and dangerous. The compound that causes sewer gas smell is hydrogen sulfide, which is produced when organic materials break down and start to rot. It’s usually present in tiny amounts in your home but goes unnoticed when the plumbing system is working properly because Queens sewer gases are vented out through the roof or contained by traps in your sewer pipes. Some sewer gas smells are easily fixed by a plumber, whereas others necessitate investigation by a Queens sewer professional. No matter what the cause, don’t wait to diagnose the problem as whatever is causing it is only bound to get worse. Hydrogen sulfide is a heavy gas, thus, the rotten egg smell that it produces will most often be strongest in the lowest level of your home. that is typically in the basement, or where a floor drain is located. Other times it can occur near toilets or sinks. Sewer gas problems are commonly caused by: A dried out water seal in a floor drain or trap Broken or cracked seals around toilets allowing water to siphon out or traps and permitting sewer gases to enter your home Rotted wood near toilets causing the same problem Dry house trap, or P trap, under a sink, shower/tub or floor drain Lack of sufficient drains or venting A plumber can usually easily remedy all of the above problems. Yet as sewer pipes age, much more serious problems can occur. Especially if you have cast iron sewer pipes, sewer gases can travel into your home through cracks in those pipes. Older...
A Frozen Sewer Line Or Drain Trap Can Be Prevented Or Cured

A Frozen Sewer Line Or Drain Trap Can Be Prevented Or Cured

A frozen sewer line, or a sewer trap is not typically a common occurrence. But when it does occur, it can close down a drain system and cause a lot of inconvenience. We all know that when water freezes, it expands in volume. This is the reason why a frozen can of soda explodes when exposed to cold temperature for a little while. The same thing happens with a sewer line or a sewer trap. When water freezes in the pipe, it expands and either causes damage to your plumbing system, or a stoppage. Similar to a can if soda, the actual burst does not happen at the point where the water starts to freeze, but at the weakest point inside the drain system. For instance, if a trap freezes the trap plugs may blow out. Pressure builds as the ice moves along inside a pipe. It continues to find a way to escape. If there is no way out, it will create its own by bursting through pipe walls. There are typically three basic situations that would make a frozen sewer line possible: Poor pipe installation, and a lack of insulation. A sudden drop in temperature, and no water flow in an exposed drain pipe. Improper thermostat setting – insufficient heat inside a building. Copper and plastic pipes are susceptible to freezing when exposed to temperatures any lower than 32 degrees Fahrenheit. In an area where a warm climate is the norm, a frozen sewer line is an inevitable risk when cold temperature strikes. That is because the pipes are commonly located in an unprotected or non-insulated open...
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