Spring Drain Cleaning: A Necessary Part Of The Change In Seasons

Spring Drain Cleaning: A Necessary Part Of The Change In Seasons

Do you wonder where and why Spring drain cleaning is important? Every change of season calls for adjustments or preparations in your home’s plumbing. Just like before Winter, when you shut off outdoor valves, or disconnect hoses, you also need to prepare for the upcoming Spring. As the cold temperature slowly increases, plumbing fixtures must be checked and adjusted accordingly.  A proper once-through ensures that water fixtures and pipe networks both outside and inside your house function without issues. In many cases, the preparation involves cleaning up the leftover dirt and debris accumulated over the Winter. Spring is always a convenient time to do an overall cleanup. Included in this process should be plumbing parts or drain connections. Ice and snow sent down by the winter can cause some issues. For example clogged drains, water seepage from exterior walls, or even damaged underground pipes. Cold temperature freezes exposed exterior pipes. Shallow exterior pipes can likewise freeze up solid. Winter also creates an accumulation of ice on roofs gutters. Remember that even metal materials become brittle when frozen. As the air slowly gets warmer, the melting ice and snow may reveal damages. Damage can include cracked pipes or leaking roof leaders, which may lead to bigger plumbing issues both inside and outside the house. To avoid the unexpected, take the time and effort to do a proper precautionary spring drain cleaning. Indoor and outdoor plumbing installations must all be checked. Here is a simple to-do list that follow. Indoor Plumbing Components  Cold winter takes a toll on the durability and therefore functionality of outdoor plumbing components. While most parts of...
An Air Gap In Your Plumbing System Prevents Health Hazards

An Air Gap In Your Plumbing System Prevents Health Hazards

In simple terms, an air gap is the simplest backflow prevention method. In a plumbing system, potable water and wastewater are intended to flow through different pipes to avoid contamination. Even with this design there is always a risk of backflow, after which wastewater cannot properly find the right pipe and enters the fresh water supply line. The most effective method to avoid this issue is by using a backflow prevention device. Air gap is the simplest form of such a device. In fact it is not a device at all, since an air gap is basically an empty unobstructed vertical space that prevents potable and non-potable water from intermingling. An air gap is usually found in the following appliances or fixtures. A Dishwasher Air Gap The term “air gap” is most commonly used in plumbing discussion, referring to a fixture that acts as a backflow preventer incorporated into a dishwasher installation. A dishwasher is connected either directly to a drain pipe under a sink, or indirectly through a garbage disposal in the same location. To create an air gap, a plumber uses a small cylindrical device mounted on the countertop parallel with a faucet. Inside the device, there are two tubes separated by an empty space which functions as air gap. The drain hose of the dishwasher goes upward and feeds the “upper” tube; the lower tube is connected to the drain pipe either directly or through a garbage disposal. Wastewater from a dishwasher will enter the cylindrical device through the upper tube, and then flow into the lower tube towards the drain pipe. If installed properly, this...
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