Unclog Sink Drains And Prevent Future Clogs: Helpful Information And Tips

Unclog Sink Drains And Prevent Future Clogs: Helpful Information And Tips

The need to unclog sink drains can be unpredictable, and always an imposition. Among all the problems that can happen to your plumbing, a clogged sink is one with some of the most obvious symptoms. It may be the gurgling sounds or a slow drain. Whichever the symptom, you can almost always tell that something is obstructing the flow of water in the pipe right under your sink. As obvious as it may seem, such a simple issue can turn into a big mess. That is especially true if you fail to notice it right away. You can turn the water off as soon as you see a pool of water in the sink. But, left unattended the water will begin to flood the floor. A clogged sink is frequently accompanied by an unpleasant odor. That is most true if  it happens in the kitchen sink, as the water contains all sorts of food residue. Drainage issues can happen not only in the kitchen but also in the garage, basement, bathroom, and any other room where you have water fixtures. A water plumbing fixture means it requires a proper draining mechanism to get rid of wastewater from the house. Soap scum may accumulate in the garage drain after many times of washing your car. Likewise, dirt can block the drain pipe of a laundry tub. Even the yard drain can turn into a place where leaves and grass collect and harden to clog the flow of rainwater in the main drain line. Lack of knowledge, tools, and finesse can lead to a sink drain disaster No matter what causes...
A Basement Drain Has Various Types And Purposes

A Basement Drain Has Various Types And Purposes

A basement drain has various types, issues, and proper installation methods.  Most homes utilize the same basic water supply and drainage systems. A main water service line delivers water into the house, usually entering through your foundation wall. From this point, water flows inside a network of supply lines, and of course, through water heater system. When any of the water fixtures in the house are opened, water comes out and ready to use. Depending on your purpose, you are easily able to choose between hot or cold water. After you use potable water, your clean fresh water turns into wastewater. This is then sent out of the property through a different network of pipes. This is where your drainage system, and a basement drain comes into play. Understanding your basement drains, maintenance, and curing basement clogs can come in handy. The network of pipes that makes up the entire plumbing system is quite complex, but all wastewater from inside the property almost always flows toward one big main house drain. In almost all cases it is buried underground. This pipe or basement drain eventually sends sewage to a wastewater treatment facility (sometimes also septic tanks) or storm drain. There may also be particular types of basement drains in your home. Let’s explain each of them so you  recognize and understand how each works. It is also important to do regular checks and proper maintenance. A floor drain under your basement slab A floor drain is installed at the lowest point of a property – the floor of the basement. This is a multi-functional drain that serves as the...
Floor Drains Can Be A Necessary And Helpful Drain Fixture

Floor Drains Can Be A Necessary And Helpful Drain Fixture

Knowing and understanding your floor drains can keep your waste water flowing in the direction they were designed for. That equates to you having a dry basement, and a basement that does not suffer from surcharges from your public sewer system, or other unexpected sources. We all know that plumbing is an inescapable part of any modern home we may live in. In fact, there are probably dozens of plumbing components you don’t realize you have or use on daily basis. Plumbing installations are not only about providing a passageway for water to travel from a supply facility to your house. Your plumbing also makes sure that wastewater is sent to the [public sewer for treatment, and likewise cannot re-enter your living space. Your kitchen sink, showers, toilets, bathtubs, and all other water fixtures are connected to network of drainage systems. An important part of the system is the floor drain. What most people do not realize is that floor drains are also the most susceptible to a backup. That is because they are the lowest to ground level. Why would you have floor drains? As the name suggests, a floor drain is a plumbing fixture designed to remove possible standing water in the floor of a structure. It typically consists of a drain grate (cover) in rectangular or round shape, sediment bucket (trap), a p-trap under the drain, and backwater valve in addition to the drain pipe itself. Residential houses can have multiple floor drains installed near the water heater, in the garage, bathroom, and even on the outside such as yard drain. In commercial buildings, floor drains...
Washing Machine Drain Hose Connections, Maintenance, and Materials

Washing Machine Drain Hose Connections, Maintenance, and Materials

Having a new washing machine, or upgrading to a newer and better model, brings the promise of more effective wash. many models also promise a quicker laundry cycle.  Cleaner resulting laundry is also a common outcome as well. Some TV commercials even go further by suggesting that certain washing machines make people happier when they do their laundry! The commercials are not entirely incorrect, but most of the time they skip the part where you need to figure out the plumbing. Connecting your appliance properly so it works as advertised is a vital part of the deal. That is when connecting your washing machine drain hose correctly becomes important. Washing Machine Drain Hose Connection Options There are two common methods to connect a washing machine drain hose to your home plumbing. Typically a washing machine drain is connected to a dedicated vertical drain pipe, or hung over a slop sink. Slop Sink Connection A slop sink (utility sink) is an easy but not recommended way to connect a washing machine drain hose. With this type of installation, the drain hose is connected directly into a wash basin. Typically the hose is hung from over the side, and then over the top rim of the sink. It is important to have a sizable air gap between the end of the drain hose, and the bottom of the sink. An air gap prevents backwater from ever getting sicked back into your washing machine. In some cases, the size of the drain pipe from the sink drain may not large enough to handle the amount of water drained from the washing machine....
Your Storm Water Drain: Installation, Care, Maintenance, And Repair

Your Storm Water Drain: Installation, Care, Maintenance, And Repair

Your storm water drain, as the name implies, is designed to drain excess rain and groundwater from multiple areas inside your property. Because it does not handle sanitary waste, storm systems often get overlooked. But a storm water drain is just as vital in protecting you and your property. The structures a storm water drain handles includes roofs, driveways, footpaths, area ways, and so on. The drain can be something as simple as a dry well in a residential area. Or it can be a complex municipal system maintained by your local government. Many of such storm water systems drain untreated wastewater into big rivers, their tributaries, or other bodies of water. Therefore, it is not acceptable throw away chemical waste, or sanitary waste, into these drains. It also suggests that ideally a storm water drain should be a separate system from your plumbing main drain (for wastewater). Combined sewers are increasingly rare today due to the potential issues with human waste contaminating open watercourses, and overburdening water treatment plants. Also, the installation costs more money than separate systems. Brief overview of how a storm water drain works A storm water drain works by diverting water from rain/storm into nearby waterways, or holding tanks, to prevent flooding. During rainstorms, large volumes of water that run off of your house, the street, sidewalk, and other surfaces is carried away by storm drains through underground pipes to the nearest water reservoir, pond, streams, rivers, or holding facility such as a dry well. Unlike a wastewater system, which carries away wastewater to be treated in a water treatment facility, a storm drain...
Septic Tank Problems And Their Typical Design

Septic Tank Problems And Their Typical Design

A septic tank system, also known as a drain field, is comprised of several porous tanks, and various pipes. This type of drain system distributes the excess waste water throughout a field. This water contains various chemicals such as phosphorous, nitrogen, as well as bacteria, that can act as a fertilizer. Excess water that enters the drain field will be eliminated through various natural processes including percolation into soil, uptake by a plant’s roots, evaporation, and transpiration either from plants or groundwater/surface water. When new wastewater enters a septic tank, it displaces the water already contained. Although carefully designed, septic tank problems do arise, more routinely in older systems.The process of organic material breakdown by bacteria causes the septic tank to produce gas. To prevent the gas from entering the house through the house sewer pipe, most plumbing systems require multiple traps throughout the house drain and house sewer system. Instead of flowing back into the house, the gas remains inside the system of tanks. The gases produced by the breakdown of waste can pose fatal problems if not vented properly, or if one is exposed without a proper breathing apparatus. Fatalities do occur each year by workers entering septic systems to perform maintenance without proper protection, ventilation, or safety harnesses. Most residential septic systems are designed with two tanks. The first tank, a smaller tank, holds solids. There is an overflow pipe, which leads to a second larger tank. The larger tank holds overflow of fluids. Each of the two tanks has weep holes, allowing for the waste water to seep into a surrounding layer of crushed stone,...
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