Your Storm Water Drain: Installation, Care, Maintenance, And Repair

Your Storm Water Drain: Installation, Care, Maintenance, And Repair

Your storm water drain, as the name implies, is designed to drain excess rain and groundwater from multiple areas inside your property. Because it does not handle sanitary waste, storm systems often get overlooked. But a storm water drain is just as vital in protecting you and your property. The structures a storm water drain handles includes roofs, driveways, footpaths, area ways, and so on. The drain can be something as simple as a dry well in a residential area. Or it can be a complex municipal system maintained by your local government. Many of such storm water systems drain untreated wastewater into big rivers, their tributaries, or other bodies of water. Therefore, it is not acceptable throw away chemical waste, or sanitary waste, into these drains. It also suggests that ideally a storm water drain should be a separate system from your plumbing main drain (for wastewater). Combined sewers are increasingly rare today due to the potential issues with human waste contaminating open watercourses, and overburdening water treatment plants. Also, the installation costs more money than separate systems. Brief overview of how a storm water drain works A storm water drain works by diverting water from rain/storm into nearby waterways, or holding tanks, to prevent flooding. During rainstorms, large volumes of water that run off of your house, the street, sidewalk, and other surfaces is carried away by storm drains through underground pipes to the nearest water reservoir, pond, streams, rivers, or holding facility such as a dry well. Unlike a wastewater system, which carries away wastewater to be treated in a water treatment facility, a storm drain...
Septic Tank Problems And Their Typical Design

Septic Tank Problems And Their Typical Design

A septic tank system, also known as a drain field, is comprised of several porous tanks, and various pipes. This type of drain system distributes the excess waste water throughout a field. This water contains various chemicals such as phosphorous, nitrogen, as well as bacteria, that can act as a fertilizer. Excess water that enters the drain field will be eliminated through various natural processes including percolation into soil, uptake by a plant’s roots, evaporation, and transpiration either from plants or groundwater/surface water. When new wastewater enters a septic tank, it displaces the water already contained. Although carefully designed, septic tank problems do arise, more routinely in older systems.The process of organic material breakdown by bacteria causes the septic tank to produce gas. To prevent the gas from entering the house through the house sewer pipe, most plumbing systems require multiple traps throughout the house drain and house sewer system. Instead of flowing back into the house, the gas remains inside the system of tanks. The gases produced by the breakdown of waste can pose fatal problems if not vented properly, or if one is exposed without a proper breathing apparatus. Fatalities do occur each year by workers entering septic systems to perform maintenance without proper protection, ventilation, or safety harnesses. Most residential septic systems are designed with two tanks. The first tank, a smaller tank, holds solids. There is an overflow pipe, which leads to a second larger tank. The larger tank holds overflow of fluids. Each of the two tanks has weep holes, allowing for the waste water to seep into a surrounding layer of crushed stone,...
About French Drains – A Drain That Is Not French

About French Drains – A Drain That Is Not French

Understanding French Drains begins with the misconception of where they originate from. There is little that is French about French drain, because in fact it was both popularized and refined in the United States. In the USA, this type of drain was named after Henry Flagg French, the man who invented it and wrote a book about farm drainage published in Massachusetts in 1859. French drains were initially used to reroute water from a sloping piece of land, to where the water could be used somewhere else. French drains were also used to remove unwanted water from a high ground to a lower ground level. They were also quickly adapted for use in houses, barns, and residential buildings, to remove human and animal wastewater which often gathered in livestock areas and created a breeding ground for mosquitoes and flies. In modern days, French drains still serve the same purpose; they move water away from basements or areas near a home’s external walls, where it can promote mildew growth. There is nothing sophisticated about a French drain, although they have been modified over the years, making use of modern materials. Basically it is a gravel-lined ditch connected to a pipe that removes water away from a building, or around a building, or structure such as a wall. It prevents water from penetrating house foundations and damaging the walls. Installation of a French Drain French drains can be installed both indoors and outdoors. Indoor French drains may go around the basement perimeter below floor level, while exterior installation requires digging below the foundation. Regardless of the location, it is best to...
A Clogged Dishwasher Drain: Prevention Includes Proper Dishwasher Installation

A Clogged Dishwasher Drain: Prevention Includes Proper Dishwasher Installation

Understanding a little bit about your dishwasher can also help prevent a clogged dishwasher drain as well. A dishwasher is basically a robot programmed to perform specific functions that clean and rinse dirty dishes. Human actions are still required to load the dirty dishes, set a proper cleaning cycle, add cleaning solution/detergent, and turn the appliance on. But the dishwasher does almost everything else automatically including: Adds clean water Heats the water to a certain temperature Opens the detergent dispenser Shoots the water onto the dishes Drains out used water and food particles Sprays clean water to rinse dishes Drains the water again Heats the air to dry off the dishes, depending on user’s setting Apart from those main functions, modern dishwashers feature a timer to regulate the cleaning cycle, a sensor to detect temperature, and another sensor to maintain proper water levels. Similar to all home appliances, however, it can only work when installed properly. A dishwasher requires a connection to electricity for power, and to the plumbing system for water and drainage. There are 4 common methods of connecting a dishwasher drain to a plumbing: air gap, high loop, connection with garbage disposal, and connection without a garbage disposal. Before installing a dishwasher, check the local plumbing and building code to make sure you do it properly. Four methods of installing a dishwasher drain 1. Air Gap Method In some areas, the building code dictates that dishwashers should be connected to an air gap installed on the sink. The main function of an air gap is to prevent contaminants from a drain line from entering the potable...